How to pitch a knitting or crochet book: tips for designers

Thanks to the internet, and particularly thanks to Ravelry, what was once an exclusive world of knitting and crochet design has now become a republic filled with fresh, new talent.

The possibilities for publishing and publicizing individual patterns have expanded online — not only through Ravelry, but also on Etsy, Craftsy, and a multitude of excellent online knitting magazines like Twist Collective. However, at the same time, the opportunities for print publishing appear to be shrinking. Print publishing is going through very hard times these days, as anyone knows who has followed the fate of newspapers, university presses, and trade publishers.

In other words, as the number of craft designers who want to publish books is expanding, the opportunities for them are in some ways contracting.

I don’t mean to be discouraging, and certainly there are still publishers (like the one that I work for) seeking out innovative ways to navigate the brave new book market. But if you want a chance to get heard when pitching your pattern book idea to a publisher, now more than ever you’re going to have bring your A game.

Having been in the shoes of both author and editor of knitting pattern books, let me offer some advice on how best to pitch a book idea:

  1. Follow instructions. It’s sad but true that many prospective authors don’t do this. Just like when you’re answering a call for designs from a magazine, you should read whatever guidelines the press offers for proposals and follow them to the letter. If you can’t pay attention to detail when writing a proposal, you’re not going to inspire confidence that you can produce a polished book project.
  2. Be as specific and concrete as possible. Editors want to know your big vision, but we also want to see that you have already swatched and sketched, and thought through the nitty-gritty details of what your collection will look like, even how it might be styled and photographed.
  3. Show that you know what the hell you’re doing. Before you pitch a book idea, you should have substantial experience with publishing individual patterns, even if all those patterns are self-published. However, the publisher will be even likelier to think you would be good to work with if you can show that you have already worked with other editors, such as at a knitting magazine. Either way, you should already have a solid, working knowledge of how the design process works from conception to swatching, pattern writing, grading, tech editing, test knitting, and styling and photography.
  4. Provide a snapshot of your audience and how to reach them. Your job as author does not end when your book is published. No matter how big your publisher is, you will likely be the main engine behind the publicity and marketing for your book. (Get those images of the fully paid book tour junket out of your head. Hardly anybody gets those anymore.) Even at the proposal stage, you should be able to provide a detailed picture of who the audience is for your book. Are there similar, successful books that you can point to that reach a similar audience? Are there related designs on Ravelry that have garnered huge popularity? Do you have a blog — or are there similar blogs — that have loyal followings? Are there clear channels for reaching this audience when publicizing the book? You should have answers to all of these questions ready to hand when pitching your book idea. Be able to demonstrate that there are people out there hungry for what you have to offer.
  5. Think of creative ways to engage the online world with your book. Publishers are desperate to figure out how to take better advantage of online technology, but most are ridiculously uncreative about how to do it. When thinking about what you can do with your book, be imaginative — as wildly imaginative as possible — about how you could connect your book to online technologies. Could your book be made available digitally, perhaps in app form? Could you use a Kickstarter campaign or similar online tool to help cover some of the upfront costs on your book? (Remember, publishers are strapped for cash these days — you might need to help raise funds to carry out your vision.) Could you create technique videos to go along with your book and post them to YouTube? Could you create a promotional video like this gorgeous one to lure readers into the world of your designs? What else could you dream up that would take your idea beyond the traditional limits of published knitting and crochet designs?

Any other tips to share? Do you have questions?

8 thoughts on “How to pitch a knitting or crochet book: tips for designers

  1. Your entire website is enlightening. It has been great reading from start to finish. And I love this blog about pitching ideas / tips for designers. Super!

  2. Very well written post and a lot of useful information. The best I found on the subject, actually. I haven’t published any books yet, but have a desire to do so. I want to ask you a question. I am confident that I can photograph my designs and can make diagrams using vector graphic software. Would you consider to create your own e-book in that case? Since as you say an author would be a main engine behind promoting her book, wouldn’t it make sence to do everything by yourself from the beginning? Thank you!

    • Hi, Natalia! Sorry to have left your comment sitting unanswered for so long — I was out of town all last week. You ask a very good question, and I think the answer depends on how wide a reach you think you already have as an individual designer. If you already have a following and a good-sized mailing list, then self-publishing just might be the way to go. But you may find it extremely valuable to have access to a publisher’s (even a small publisher’s) mailing list and social media reach. Another consideration is how much creative control you want. The more people you have involved (publishers, tech editors, photographers, illustrators, etc.), the more you’ll have to be open to compromise, because all of those people are creative people, too. It’s your book, but if you want it to be YOUR BOOK (with all creative decisions entirely in your hands), then self-publishing is the way to go. Best of luck!

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