Men’s and boys’ knitting roundup: special Gift-A-Long edition

GAL14_728x90_Joinusf

With the Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) starting on Ravelry tonight (at 8pm EST), I thought I’d show you some of my favorites of the men’s and boys’ patterns that are eligible for the GAL’s generous 25% discount.

There are 293 designers participating in the GAL, each person putting between 4 and 20 patterns on sale, so wading through everything can take a while. There is, of course, a great pleasure to be had in this browsing—a pleasure I’ve been indulging in last night and this morning—but if you’re looking specifically for men’s and boys’ knits, the search could get a little tedious.

Never fear! I’ve pulled together a substantial catalog of my favorites from the men’s and boys’ patterns that are part of this year’s GAL. This is by no means a complete list of what’s available in the GAL for men and boys—these are just some of my faves.

Also bear in mind that some of these designers have multiple patterns up for boys and men, so if you see something you like, click on the designer’s name on the Ravelry pattern page, and see what else they’ve got in their Gift-A-Long bundle!


MEN’S PATTERNS

Chum’s Pullover by Kate Bostwick
Such a great neckline. Perfect for men who are either slim or very muscular.

Full_Frontal

Cashmere Cosy by Loraine Birchall
It is entirely possible that I am being influenced by what is—erm—not the hat in this photo.

TIM_3820

Saturnalia Infinity Scarf by Elizabeth Elliott
Modern look and a great way to make a neutral yarn fun to knit.

web_circle6-T

Dawson by Elizabeth Green Musselman (that’s me!)
Shawl collars are perfect for the cold, and the texture keeps the knitting interesting.

4857231461_dfd4fb66f5_z

Askance by Rich Ensor
Rich has tons of great men’s socks available in the GAL.

Askance_WEB_medium

Bilateral Beanie by Karin Wilmoth
I’ve included two photos here to show you how cool this reversible, double-knit hat is.

Rayguns by Annie Watts
For the sci-fi fan, it doesn’t get any cooler than these gloves. Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!

IMG_0099

Johannes by Suvi Simola
Excellent use of texture—and three cheers for the non-standard issue model.

_01S7181

Pigment by Lee Meredith
For the man who loves color, this scarf is where it’s at.

10866284653_7cd271deba_b

Black Slant by Anneh Fletcher
Anneh’s socks are modeled by women, but most are perfect for men and all have interesting construction.

IMG_2637_sm


BOYS’ PATTERNS

There are a number of great designs for baby and toddler boys in the GAL, but here I’m focusing on boys aged 4–18.

Umberto by Sarah Ronchetti
Great classic knit, in both sweater and vest version, sized 3mos to 12 years.

mommato8_medium

Little Fox Mittens by Birch Hollow Cottage
Birch Hollow has a whole range of woodland creature mittens in the GAL.

IMG_3821

Lighthouse Keeper by Andrea Sanchez
This adorable, quick, bulky knit comes in sizes 6mos to 12 years.

image

Japhy by Elizabeth Sullivan
Will wonders never cease? A sweater pattern written just for teen boys!

Japhy_Sweater_1

Texo Pullover by Anjali M
Who doesn’t love pockets? Just enough texture, too. Sized for toddlers to tweens.

IMG_1668

Mt. Hood Snow Cap by Star Athena
This hat is sized for children and adults, but looks especially dashing on this little guy.

6798529873_6b24d3bf28_b

Langstroth by Elizabeth Green Musselman (yup, me again)
One of my first designs and still one of my favorites—just knits, purls and slip stitches.

langstroth-sm

Limepop Sweater by Terri Kruse
Another classic use of texture and raglan shaping, sized 12 mos to 8 years.

YSAweb5


Have fun! And don’t forget to join the knitalongs that go along with the GAL.

It’s good to be multicraftual

Behold, friends – one week’s worth of crochet:

My son has the audacity to have not just one teacher but seven assistant teachers. The idea of making handmade gifts under these circumstances is pretty deranged.

But I am deranged, so off we go. Two years ago, I knit everyone flower pins. Last year, I flaked. I was stumped about this year. All the small gifts that I could find either seemed lame or impossible to accomplish for eight separate people.

Enter the super-fast craft called crochet. Crochet, I love you. I would not marry you – I’m already married to knitting – but you are a fabulous fling on the side. You give me seven hats in as many days. Knitting cannot do that for me. Crochet, remind me to buy you something sparkly.

So these hats are for the assistant teachers. Liam’s main teacher wears head scarves every day, so is not a good candidate for a hat. So she’s getting the non-stanky bag that you see described in the posts below.

ETA

In the comments on the previous post, Sara posted the very helpful suggestion that I soak my reeking crocheted bag in vinegar, borax, or Oxyclean, and then wash it with regular detergent. (Thanks, Sara, for giving my bag a brief clemency!)

This technique may very well work 99.9% of the time, but even after this treatment my bag still made me want to retch every time I got within a foot of it.

Into the trash can it went. It’s the first time I’ve ever just tossed a finished object. It only took me four hours to make, though, so I’m not sweating it.

To console myself, I immediately got out this luscious little Noro tidbit:

Several months ago, I had picked up three skeins of Matsuri (87% cotton, 13% wool, 100% gorgeous Noro dye work) for some unknown thing or other. OK, I probably just got it because it’s purty and I can’t resist lime green.

So this is going to be the new mesh grocery bag for my son’s teacher. All signs point to it not stinking.

Bring in the funk

Yesterday I crocheted a grocery bag as a Christmas gift for my son’s teacher. It’s simple (just some double crochet at a big gauge), but I like how it turned out.

The only problem? This bag stinks. I do not mean that it stinks visually or in terms of its construction. No, it REEKS. It is S-T-A-N-K-Y.

What does it smell like? Oh, I’m so glad you asked. The answer is VOMIT.

I noticed the stench when I started knitting with the yarn. I decided to muscle through it, taking shallow breaths, telling myself the smell would come out in the wash.

It didn’t.

I have washed this sucker three times in the strongest smelling detergent I have, and it still smells like the very last thing on earth that you would want to put your newly purchased produce into.

So. What to do with a crocheted bag that smells like vomit? Diaper pail liner? Donation to the Let’s Give Sarah Palin an Affordable Makeover Fund?