Boys’ knitting roundup #6

Let’s check in on what’s happening in the world of boys’ knitting patterns!


Sometimes people hesitate to knit for kids because they’re worried they’ll outgrow the knits even faster than you can make them. When that kind of fear hits, reach for the Beckley pattern, new from Marjorie Dussaud (who has designed a number of snappy boys’ sweaters).

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Knit in a bulky-weight yarn, this shawl-collared sweater will work up very quickly. I love how the designer has used simple stitches to fashionable effect here. Even better: in all the photos, the kid looks very comfortable.


If you would like to tackle a garment with a little more texture, designer Lori Versaci again brings the fabulous with her new Open Star Kid pattern.

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I love how Lori has used a lace stitch here to rugged effect. Given how hot most little boys’ temperatures run, having a little extra ventilation is an excellent plan.


And finally, if you need a quick accessory to take the chill off the changing seasons, check out Tin Can Knits’ Paddle pattern. One of 14 patterns in their forthcoming Road Trip book, this design exemplifies how well the Tin Can Knits team can take a classic design, modernize it, and offer maximum sizes (in this case, toddler through adult L).

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Reviews of Kung Fu Knits have started to come out! My favorite so far appears in episode 53 of the Down Cellar Studio podcast (review begins at 15:15). The host, BostonJen, recorded a hilarious segment with her nieces and nephew in which they beg to hear the story again and to have all the things in the book knitted for them.

Men’s knitting roundup #4

Since the holidays are rapidly approaching, today’s men’s knitting pattern roundup will focus on accessories – that is, quick gifts that can still be accomplished between now and possibly even Hannukah, though that comes quite early this year!

ImageFirst up: some beautifully designed socks by Jennifer Beever, a relatively new designer based in Calgary. The pattern, called Josh, has some fine features, including a false rib pattern down the back of the leg that merges seamlessly into the heel flap. It’s a great, classic sock that even men with the most conservative clothing tastes could appreciate. Josh can be yours for $5 Canadian on Ravelry (that’s just a little less than $5 US).

Jennifer also recently published a pair of garter-stitch mittens that would be perfect for men living in cold climates.

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ImageThis next duo of patterns, the Tolt Hat and Mitts by Andrea Rangel (available together for $8 on Ravelry), would make a perfect gift set and would appeal particularly to younger men, I suspect. If you are new to stranded colorwork, this would make a great pattern to cut your teeth on, as the stitch pattern is fairly simple, quick, and satisfying at a worsted-weight gauge.

When choosing colors for your own project, just make sure to select two colors that have some significant difference in light value. (That is, choose one color that’s relatively light and another that’s rather dark.) Otherwise, all your hard-won colorwork will be difficult to see.

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ImageAnother design that’s likely to appeal to younger men (and boys!) is Elizabeth Murphy’s Goblin Hat. I love the clever construction on these: if you’ve ever been baffled by how to wear a slouchy hat, you will love how this buttoned-down version makes the wearing of a slouchy hat simple. And what a great stash-buster for leftover bits of worsted-weight yarn. Plus, the pattern is free!

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If you need a super-quick knit, try the Courage fingerless mitts (also free) by another new designer, Elizabeth Davis. This pattern includes instructions for three sizes and two lengths (short length shown here), so you can whip up several pairs for people on your list.