Men’s knitting roundup #10

It’s been several months since we peeked into the latest men’s knitwear designs. Let’s go exploring…. Today we’re all about color.


Looking for new men’s designs can sometimes be an exercise in despair—frankly, most of what I see is either awfully frumpy or is really designed for women and has been questionably tagged for men. (Mind you, I have pretty wide-ranging beliefs about what looks great on men, but even my liberal limits are frequently tested by overzealous tagging.)

And then, like a bolt out of the blue, you come across something like this…

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PINCH ME but that is luscious. This is Wester Ross by Welsh designer Jane Howorth and knit, of course, out of Noro Kureyon. Pictured here on a teenager, the sizing ranges from 34.5–53.5 inch chest. I absolutely love the way the cabling and knit-and-purl texture plays with the striping effect of the yarn, the way the saddle shoulder cleverly travels across the top back (see below), the extra-long ribbing and thumb holes at the cuffs, and the impeccable shaping (no slouchiness!).

Jane has designed some other gorgeous men’s sweaters that you should also take a gander at; I will definitely be keeping an eye on her from now on.

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Bristol Ivy’s Quoin cowl is worked in three colors of worsted-weight wool—potentially yarn you already have in your stash. I love how she has combined asymmetrical striping and deep chevrons into a simple-to-knit but bold design. It’s like a Color Affection Shawl for your neck … with a lot less knitting.


Looking for a more ambitious knit to occupy the long summer days? I love this Mayan Ouroboros scarf pattern from Tania Richter. The instructions can be purchased individually or as part of an eight-pattern e-book called Fantasy Art Knits—all double-knit scarves with fantasy creatures fabulously charted out (in both senses of the word fabulous!). Five patterns have been released so far, including a Nine-Tailed Kitsune that is screaming my name.

Boys’ knitting roundup #7

In the northern hemisphere at least, we have entered those months when even boys will admit that it’s cold outside. So let’s take a look at some great knitting patterns that have been released recently for boys in the 5–18 age bracket!


I gasped when I saw this next garment: the Gossamer Sweater by Ukrainian designer Natalie Pelykh.

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Worked from the top down seamlessly using the contiguous method, this piece should make for a very enjoyable knit, with just enough texture to make a knitter happy. And I love how rich it looks in a hand-dyed semi-solid. The garment comes in a very wide range of well-gradated sizes (from 12 months to 14 years).


Here’s a fun one for the young fantasist in your life: the Bilby hood by Cristina Ghirlanda.

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For years, my son has wanted a wolf hood to wear when he’s terrorizing the backyard. Even though this is sized for toddlers through 6-year-olds, it’s knit in fingering weight, so I imagine moving up a yarn weight or two would make this piece large enough for larger noggins.


If you’re looking for a stash buster and are knitting for a kid who likes a good ski hat style, check out Cindy Dell’s Yellowstone Hat pattern.

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You can always omit the pompom if Mr. Man is not amenable to such frippery, but I hope for your sake that the recipient is pro-pompom.


Finally, for a quick way to turn boring boots into the Funnest Footwear Ever, check out this great tutorial on the Glamour 4 You blog. With some simple chain stitching, your whole family can have more colorful (and warmer!) boots.

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Men’s and boys’ knitting roundup: special Gift-A-Long edition

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With the Indie Design Gift-A-Long (GAL) starting on Ravelry tonight (at 8pm EST), I thought I’d show you some of my favorites of the men’s and boys’ patterns that are eligible for the GAL’s generous 25% discount.

There are 293 designers participating in the GAL, each person putting between 4 and 20 patterns on sale, so wading through everything can take a while. There is, of course, a great pleasure to be had in this browsing—a pleasure I’ve been indulging in last night and this morning—but if you’re looking specifically for men’s and boys’ knits, the search could get a little tedious.

Never fear! I’ve pulled together a substantial catalog of my favorites from the men’s and boys’ patterns that are part of this year’s GAL. This is by no means a complete list of what’s available in the GAL for men and boys—these are just some of my faves.

Also bear in mind that some of these designers have multiple patterns up for boys and men, so if you see something you like, click on the designer’s name on the Ravelry pattern page, and see what else they’ve got in their Gift-A-Long bundle!


MEN’S PATTERNS

Chum’s Pullover by Kate Bostwick
Such a great neckline. Perfect for men who are either slim or very muscular.

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Cashmere Cosy by Loraine Birchall
It is entirely possible that I am being influenced by what is—erm—not the hat in this photo.

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Saturnalia Infinity Scarf by Elizabeth Elliott
Modern look and a great way to make a neutral yarn fun to knit.

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Dawson by Elizabeth Green Musselman (that’s me!)
Shawl collars are perfect for the cold, and the texture keeps the knitting interesting.

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Askance by Rich Ensor
Rich has tons of great men’s socks available in the GAL.

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Bilateral Beanie by Karin Wilmoth
I’ve included two photos here to show you how cool this reversible, double-knit hat is.

Rayguns by Annie Watts
For the sci-fi fan, it doesn’t get any cooler than these gloves. Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!

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Johannes by Suvi Simola
Excellent use of texture—and three cheers for the non-standard issue model.

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Pigment by Lee Meredith
For the man who loves color, this scarf is where it’s at.

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Black Slant by Anneh Fletcher
Anneh’s socks are modeled by women, but most are perfect for men and all have interesting construction.

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BOYS’ PATTERNS

There are a number of great designs for baby and toddler boys in the GAL, but here I’m focusing on boys aged 4–18.

Umberto by Sarah Ronchetti
Great classic knit, in both sweater and vest version, sized 3mos to 12 years.

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Little Fox Mittens by Birch Hollow Cottage
Birch Hollow has a whole range of woodland creature mittens in the GAL.

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Lighthouse Keeper by Andrea Sanchez
This adorable, quick, bulky knit comes in sizes 6mos to 12 years.

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Japhy by Elizabeth Sullivan
Will wonders never cease? A sweater pattern written just for teen boys!

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Texo Pullover by Anjali M
Who doesn’t love pockets? Just enough texture, too. Sized for toddlers to tweens.

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Mt. Hood Snow Cap by Star Athena
This hat is sized for children and adults, but looks especially dashing on this little guy.

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Langstroth by Elizabeth Green Musselman (yup, me again)
One of my first designs and still one of my favorites—just knits, purls and slip stitches.

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Limepop Sweater by Terri Kruse
Another classic use of texture and raglan shaping, sized 12 mos to 8 years.

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Have fun! And don’t forget to join the knitalongs that go along with the GAL.

Boys’ knitting roundup #6

Let’s check in on what’s happening in the world of boys’ knitting patterns!


Sometimes people hesitate to knit for kids because they’re worried they’ll outgrow the knits even faster than you can make them. When that kind of fear hits, reach for the Beckley pattern, new from Marjorie Dussaud (who has designed a number of snappy boys’ sweaters).

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Knit in a bulky-weight yarn, this shawl-collared sweater will work up very quickly. I love how the designer has used simple stitches to fashionable effect here. Even better: in all the photos, the kid looks very comfortable.


If you would like to tackle a garment with a little more texture, designer Lori Versaci again brings the fabulous with her new Open Star Kid pattern.

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I love how Lori has used a lace stitch here to rugged effect. Given how hot most little boys’ temperatures run, having a little extra ventilation is an excellent plan.


And finally, if you need a quick accessory to take the chill off the changing seasons, check out Tin Can Knits’ Paddle pattern. One of 14 patterns in their forthcoming Road Trip book, this design exemplifies how well the Tin Can Knits team can take a classic design, modernize it, and offer maximum sizes (in this case, toddler through adult L).

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Reviews of Kung Fu Knits have started to come out! My favorite so far appears in episode 53 of the Down Cellar Studio podcast (review begins at 15:15). The host, BostonJen, recorded a hilarious segment with her nieces and nephew in which they beg to hear the story again and to have all the things in the book knitted for them.

Men’s knitting roundup #6

Time for our monthly check-in with what’s new in men’s knitting patterns!

You know what makes you want to knit a man a cowl? This guy.

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Before he put on this super-bulky alpaca cowl, he wasn’t much to look at. But pop on that great-looking neck accessory and a leather coat, and BAM! This simple-but-effective pattern by Los Angeles LYS Knitculture (hilariously called Man Cowl) is free on Ravelry.


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All ye Outlander fans really need to check out Rowan magazine issue 56, which features absolutely stunning Scots-inspired colorwork and cabling, including six sweater patterns for men.

My personal favorite is Craggie by Marie Wallin (shown above). That mashup of stranded knitting and cables is luscious.


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For another exciting update on the classic men’s cabled sweater, check out Shannon Mullett-Bowlsby’s Men’s Cabled Knit Sweater. There are a lot of thoughtful details in the construction of this garment—such as instructions for a longer torso and a wider turtleneck—that will ensure a flattering and comfortable fit.


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If you enjoy knitting socks, definitely check out the new book Sock Architecture by Lara Neel of Math4Knitters. The book has tons of great information about how to measure for and customize socks to fit any foot—and most of the patterns in the second half of the book would work just as well for men and women, both in terms of sizing and looks.

I’ve already knit the Strie, Toe Up Socks for my husband, and I’ve got my eye on Bootstrap next (pictured above).

Kung Fu Knits book trailer!

Book trailers—that is, videos that give potential readers a peek inside a book—have become all the rage these days. For my first pattern book, I decided to create a book trailer of my own, especially since it helps me to better explain what this funny pattern collection / comic book hybrid is all about. Hope you enjoy watching it!

And while we’re on the subject of how to get a peek inside Kung Fu Knits, I’ve got a tour of some great reviewers lined up for the next couple of months. On the dates listed below, you can find each of these bloggers / podcasters reviewing my book! There are other reviews on the horizon beyond this list, but this will give you a great start in figuring out whether Kung Fu Knits is right for you.

Kung Fu Knits blog/podcast tour

22 September | Mixed Martial Arts & Crafts blog | http://www.mixedmartialartsandcrafts.com
24 September | Fibretown podcast | http://fibretown.blogspot.com
28 September | Must Stash podcast | http://muststashpodcast.com
29 September | Through the Back Loops blog | http://throughthebackloops.wordpress.com
2 October | Through the Looking Glass blog | http://noirbettie.com/blog/
5 October | The Knitgirllls podcast | http://theknitgirllls.com
10 October | Makewise Designs blog | http://makewisedesigns.com
15 October | Sunset Cat Designs blog | http://www.sunsetcat.com/blog/
17 October | Joeli’s Kitchen podcast | http://www.joeliskitchen.com/the-podcast/
22 October | Slate Falls Press blog | http://www.slatefallspressbooks.com
3 November | Wattsolak blog | http://wattsolak.com
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Available now on Ravelry and Cooperative Press’s website.

Boys’ knitting roundup #5

Time to check in with what’s new and awesome in the world of boys’ knitting patterns!


My jaw dropped when I spotted this sweater from Danish designer Nanna Gudmand-Høyer.

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This design is appropriately named Robotto, and the pattern is available for free in English, Danish, and German (Ravelry link). Sizes are 6–12. The colorwork is so brilliantly designed, and I love the designer’s suggestion to have the wearer help you pick out the colors. For best results, just make sure to choose a set of colors that ranges from pretty dark to very light.


If Robotto looks a little (or a lot) past your current knitting skill set, check out Lori Versaci’s Basic Kid Pattern.

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Sized for 2–14 year olds (there’s also a separate baby pattern), this classic crew neck comes with instructions for either a pullover or cardigan version. Imagine how much use you could get out of this one pattern! The shaping is simple (modified drop shoulders look good on kids but are easy to knit), and I know from firsthand experience how well-written Lori’s patterns are. If you’ve not tried knitting a sweater before, what better way to start than with a smaller canvas!


If it’s still warm where you are (it’ll be 102 degrees here today) or if your kid isn’t so much into sweaters, why not check into some cool new crocheted toys? Megan Kreiner’s new book Bathtime Buddies is a riot of original sea creatures and people (Ravelry link). If you’ve not done any/much crocheting before, these fun and simple animals would make the perfect way to cut your teeth.

How about this sweet-faced otter trying to break open a clam? Or a swarm of jellyfish?

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There are 20 patterns in all (narwhal, manatee, octopus, lobsters deep-sea diver…) that perfectly straddle that line between realism and cuteness. The book even comes with a digital download so you can view it on your tablet or computer.


And let’s not leave out the older guys—for you, I’d point out a new handsome scarf-shaped shawl, Descent into Madness, by Josh Ryks.

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So many knitters love making these sideways shawls—they knit up quickly and you can use up all of that luscious hand-dyed skein—and it’s great to see one modeled here by a young man to make visually clear just how gender-spanning this style of shawl really is.

This looks like a really fun knit, as you can see from this closeup of the varied stitch patterns, knit with two coordinating colors of fingering-weight yarn. The pattern is available either for individual sale or as part of a collection of three geometric shawls.

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Finally, I can’t resist mentioning that I’ve got a six-pattern collection for boys coming out very soon from Cooperative Press—September 15, to be specific. It’s a comic book and pattern collection in one: the comic-book storyline designed to entice your favorite kid into DESPERATELY wanting the hand knits. (Because we all know what a tough sell that can be sometimes.) The book will be available both in PDF-only (for $9.95) and paperback + PDF (for $15.95). I’ll let you know when the preorder page goes up!

Here’s a photo from the book that I haven’t released yet…

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Shown here are the three pieces in the kung fu uniform (gi): the jacket, pants, and belt, all knit in Berroco Vintage. My son, Liam, did the modeling for the book, and he couldn’t have been a better sport. It’s rarely very cold here in Texas, so he got a bit toasty shooting this, but never broke a sweat, as it were. I love his tough-guy expressions in some of these shots, too.